Thursday, August 09, 2007

What do we get?

We have been debating and fighting over political issues; like what kinda of system we will have, the injustice, etc. Hardly we talk about the social benefits we the people should have and get. Hardly this question is ever asked by anyone or answered. Mostly its just "Golhaaboa". All focus is given on that word.

I think now it might be the right time for one to question things like social welfare and other related issues. Starting from things like how the state taxes the people, be it a flat tax, regressive tax or a progressive tax system, and should the higher earners be taxed to a greater extent? The amount of taxation is also crucial, as lower tax rates can be more business friendly, generating jobs and reducing unemployment, whereas higher taxes can be used to fund public services, state pensions and unemployment benefits.

Other key issues like how the state implements benefits for the unemployed, pensions, maternity leave and disabilities. Other issues like should services such as health care can be almost entirely state funded at one extreme, private insurance-based on the other, or somewhere in between? Another element can be public transport and education. I guess education is a key element which needs real attention.

One of the great challenges of sustainable development is to combine society's desires for economic prosperity and social security. For decades economists and politicians have debated how to reconcile the undoubted power of markets with the reassuring protections of social insurance. Presently we the Maldivians hardly demand anything from the governments till today social benefits provided by the state is seen something more like "sarukaaruge haasa inaayah" or "raees ge hey yofulhukan". Question is will it remain the same; even after the so called political reforms. What will the people gain after all these flights and struggle? At the end will all the benefits end up in bank accounts of the parliamentarians or the president and a few privileged, like it has been.

I feel these are not questions that should be left out or ignored saying I don't want to be political, etc. These are basic rights of everyone to know about them and to have those rights.

4 comments:

moyameehaa said...

nice post.but to tell the truth i should say many maldivians fear politics...kinda phobia.and that reform thingy is like history repeating itself.remember nasir and the reformist gayom? well another reform is taking place...but this time its is not going to be a person like gayom, its gonna be a party.. who knws.. maybe it could be 'the party' one day.

anways people are blindly followin MDP hoping that it would oust gayom and (yeah only after that) bring reform...

yaa said...

Sofwath and Moyameehaa, it isn’t the President himself (present or future) or a party per se that would bring about good and sustainable development that we are seeking. A bunch of few and sincere politicians as Ministers would do the magic; this isn’t an impossible outcome either. In fact, doing it properly will be far easier and less costly than doing things wrong and struggling forever (both citizens and the nation inclusive).

Abdulla Yasir said...

Sofwath and Moyameehaa, it isn’t the President himself (present or future) or a party per se that would bring about good and sustainable development that we are seeking. A bunch of few and sincere politicians as Ministers would do the magic; this isn’t an impossible outcome either. In fact, doing it properly will be far easier and less costly than doing things wrong and struggling forever (both citizens and the nation inclusive).

Mare' said...

When moyameeha said its a phobia I agree but why it became a phobia and what will be the tool to solve that?